Kuk Sool Won

The roots of Kuk Sool date back to the very beginning of Korea with “Sado Mu Sool” which means family or tribal martial art.

The next martial art to develop was “Bulkyo Mu Sool”, or “Buddhist martial art”. Shortly afterwards came “Koong Joong Mu Sool” which translates to ‘Royal Court Martial Art’. These are the three segments of ancient Korean martial arts from which the techniques of Kuk Sool evolved. Although its origin may be traced back to antiquity, the present Kuk Sool system was formally devised only recently.

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Krav Maga

A practical and tactical system which teaches how to prevent, deal and overcome all kinds of violence and attacks.

KM prepares the trainees in the subjects of self-defense, self protection, fighting and combat skills, as well as skills to defend others, all in unique and comprehensive teachings and way.

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Kobudo

Kobudo a Japanese term that can be translated as "old martial way of Okinawa".

It generally refers to the classical weapon traditions of Okinawan martial arts, most notably the rokushakubo (six foot staff, known as the b?), sai (short unsharpened dagger), tonfa (handled club), kama (sickle), and nunchaku (nunchucks), but also the tekko (knuckledusters), tinbe-rochin (shield and spear), and surujin (weighted chain). Less common Okinawan weapons include the tambo (short staff) and the eku (boat oar of traditional Okinawan design).

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Kickboxing

Kickboxing started in the US during the 1970’s when American karate practitioners became frustrated with strict controls on martial arts competitions that didn’t allow full contact kicks and punches.

Many questions were raised when the sport began about the high risk of injury. As a result, safety rules were improved and protective clothing was added. As this is a relatively new sport there are no long-term traditions.

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Kendo

Kendo, meaning "Way of the Sword", is a modern Japanese martial art of sword-fighting based on traditional Japanese swordsmanship, or Kenjutsu. It is a physically and mentally challenging activity that combines strong martial arts values with sport-like physical elements.

Since the earliest samurai government in Japan, during the Kamakura period (1185-1233), sword fencing, together with horse riding and archery, were the main martial pursuits of the military clans. In this period kendo developed under the strong influence of Zen Buddhism.

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