Ok so I know I said I would talk about the instruments of capoeira but I have just finished a class where the importance of the songs came up.
  After a crazy weekend at the movement Jam in Auckland, I am painstakingly putting together the very first ever episode of my hitch hiking documentary. Three days of running, leaping, vaulting and flipping around Auckland (ok ok I was behind the camera mostly) with guys from all over the country has been a great way to get to know not just the style but the people who practise it. Anyone can get a wikipidia definition of a style but only by meeting the people can you truly get a sense of what it is about (because the people who practise make the style).  
As week four comes to a close I find myself trying to work out how to retain and improve the knowledge I have gained. Asking each instructor I was given four separate movements to focus on. In the hope that this weekend at the big parkour gathering in Auckland I will be able to keep up with everyone else.
  Kaizen is a Japanese word which has no corresponding meaning in English. Basically it means constant never ending improvement. Often people initially are sceptical about my teachings but they do not appreciate that in my seminars I often get people practicing techniques and methods that would normally be considered advanced in many styles. After just a couple of hours with me to see the measurable confidence and ability is a living testament to both my ability as a teacher and the methods that I practice.  
Untitled document The roots of Parkour go back over 100 years. It begins with Hebertism. Hebertism was created about 100 years ago by George Hebert. George Hébert (1875-1957) exerted a major influence on the development of physical education in France. A former naval officer, he travelled throughout the world before World War 1 and was struck by th